Press Release: Pavilions on the Park awarded first place at the Urban Development Institute of Australia (NSW) Awards for Excellence

Press Release: Pavilions on the Park awarded first place at the Urban Development Institute of Australia (NSW) Awards for Excellence

3.09.10

Pavilions on the Park was awarded best medium density development at the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA) NSW Awards for Excellence.

The UDIA Awards are a high profile annual program that highlights and rewards innovation, sustainability and industry leadership within the urban development industry.

The Awards also highlight the contribution made by the consulting professions such as architects, environmentalists, engineers and planners.

The judging panel, consisting of Bob Hayward, Peter Andrews, Jim Barrett and Alan Zammit, made the following comments about Pavilions on the Park:

“Located close to the major transport hub of St Leonards, this development successfully addresses the constraints of a narrow parcel of land adjoining the main north shore rail line, by creating a medium rise apartment complex facing Newlands Park. Pavilions on the Park houses 195 apartments in a mix of one, two and three bedrooms, with internal and external living spaces orientated towards the park. The design achieves a degree of choice in apartment layouts.

The massing of the buildings are highly articulated and well set back from the street creating a scale, which sits comfortably with the surrounding residential areas. The landscape setback becomes an extension to the park and further integrates the building within its park setting.”

UDIA NSW President, Judy McKittrick congratulated the winners, recognising them as the “very best in urban development in NSW.”

Architects Allen Jack+Cottier (AJ+C) worked closely with developers Australand through all phases of the project. Stage one, consisting of 195 apartments, was completed in the first half of 2009 at a cost of $55 million. The development experienced strong sales and market appeal in a depressed market.